Home | 

SANTA ROSA COUNTY GOVERNMENT

Residential Driveway Permits on County Roads

A driveway permit is automatically created with every new detached single family building permit, mobile home installation permit or substantial single family remodel permit issued by Development Services. That permit is passed to the Road and Bridge department under Public Works so that staff can perform a pre inspection to determine what type of driveway is needed. Platted subdivisions are the exception to this rule because often the engineer of record has determined what is needed prior to plat approval. A driveway information packet is mailed or emailed to all permit holders a few days after the building permits are purchased from Development Services. There are several different designs for creating driveways. Curb and gutter, swale, culvert or flat. The inspection process differs depending on the driveway type, and through this article we plan to provide some clarity in what is expected with each type.

Curb and Gutter- The use of curbs and gutters protects the edge of the asphalt from damage due to vehicle loads. Vehicles driving and/or parking too close to the edge of an asphalt driveway will cause the edges to buckle under the weight. The curb holds the asphalt pavement in place, even if a vehicle drives or parks on the edge of the asphalt surface and also helps to channel water to inlets.                

Inspection Process:
  • Preliminary- This inspection is often done once the permit is received.
  • Pre-pour- This inspection should be requested by the contractor. The inspector checks:
    • Form boards
    • Curbing cut-out
    • That all debris is removed from area to be poured
  • Final- This inspection should be requested by the contractor prior to needing a Certificate of Occupancy.
    • The most common fail on final inspections is the lack of sod for erosion control. Two feet of sod is required around the poured driveway and right of way.
Culvert is a structure that allows water to flow under a road, railroad, trail or similar obstruction. Culverts are most commonly constructed from corrugated metal or reinforced concrete.  

Inspection Process:
  • Preliminary- This inspection is often done once the permit is received. The inspector makes note of water flow on the property. This inspection is often conducted before the site has been cleared or just afterwards.
    • Line and Grade- This inspection should be requested by the contractor. The inspector will visit the site and set a PK Nail in the center of the road to assist with the driveway location. An inspection report will be left in the job box stating what elevation will be needed for each end of the pipe. At this time, it will also be determined if pipe and stormwater inlets (drop boxes) will be needed for the length of the right of way. Drop boxes are most common in the Holley by the Sea and areas that remain wet for long periods of time.
  • Pre-pour- This inspection should be requested by the contractor. The inspector checks:
    • Form boards
    • Elevation of pipes and grade
    • Stormwater inlet
    • Debris is removed from area to be poured
  • Final- This inspection should be requested by the contractor prior to needing a Certificate of Occupancy. The most common fail on final inspections is the lack of sod for erosion control. Two feet of sod is required around the poured driveway, drop boxes, mitered ends and right of way.
  Swale or Flat- Swale and flat driveways follow the same inspection schedule as Culverts.